The (Flushed) Face of Fever

Your child is sweaty, then cold, then sweaty again. He or she is lethargic, flushed, and has no appetite. Fever has struck.

Although fever takes a toll on a kid, it’s not usually something to worry about. The body’s elevated temperature is a sign that it’s at work, fighting off infection or illness. Colds, flu, ear infections, and croup are common causes of fever.

Normal body temperature is 98.6°F, but even a healthy person’s temperature fluctuates throughout the day — within a pretty narrow range. A fever usually means a rectal or ear temperature of at least 100.4°F, an oral temperature of more than 99.5°F, or an armpit temperature of at least 99°F.

For fevers under 102°F (or 100.4°F for infants under 12 weeks), home remedies are usually the way to go. The fever needs to run its course, but you can help relieve your child’s discomfort by

  • Keeping him or her hydrated
  • Encouraging him or her to rest
  • Giving a fever reducer, like acetaminophen or ibuprofen

Contact your child’s pediatrician if your child’s temperature is over 101 degrees for 3 days or 72 hours. If your infant is under the age of 3 months, see his or her pediatrician if his or her temperature peaks above 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit at anytime.

If your infant’s fever is accompanied by any of the following you should contact your doctor’s office: earache, cough, sore throat, rash, pain with urination, fussiness, trouble sleeping or any other worries.

If you are concerned about your child’s fever, speak with a registered nurse any time, day or night, by calling 317-338-KIDS, or click here to request a nurse callback now.


This entry was posted in Fever, HealthLines Blog. Bookmark the permalink.
Add Comment Register



Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>